American

One of Irving Berlin's earliest compositions, preserved on a cylinder recording.

Composed and written by Irving Berlin, "Yiddisha Nightingale" was first recorded by Maurice Burkhardt in 1911.

This portrait of Frederick Douglass is part of the portfolio Nine Drawings by Ben Shahn, published by the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee of the American Civil Liberties Union, Ne

The design shows clasped hands of a woman and man, crown, and extensive inscription. The bridegroom is Aaron Jacob, son of David; the bride is Edel, daughter of Joel Hirsch.

This colorful poster designed by Lionel Kalish offers whimsical cartoons to illustrate the meanings of Yiddish words

One of several "language lesson" posters created during the late 1960s by the American artist Lionel Kalish (b. 1931). Kalish is also notable as a painter and children's book illustrator.

This painting is based on a snapshot showing the Schwartz men on their way to synagogue in the 1940s

Chicago artist Howard Schwartz combines the past and the present in mixed media portraits inspired by his family story, a story that, like that of many Chicago families, begins its American chapter

This painting by a Chicago artist is an homage to Mondrian’s paintings of the same name.

Vera Klement was born to Russian Jewish immigrants in The Free City of Danzig (today, Gdansk, Poland) in 1929.

This handsome circumcision set was made during the heyday of American surgical instrument manufacturing.

Ferdinand G.

Now in his ninth decade, the artist Irving Petlin was born in Chicago in 1934 to parents from Eastern Europe and raised in the Wicker Park neighborhood.

In Petlin’s body of work he returns again and again to certain resonant objects and figures, recalled or imagined, in order to see them again from new perspectives and discover alternate meanings.

In this painting a Chicago artist depicts Eastern European folklore

In Eastern Europe, legend had it that during a cholera epidemic if two orphans would marry in a cemetery then their dead parents might intercede to stop the epidemic.

This typewriter was used by the Chicago journalist Morris Indritz.

Morris Indritz was born in 1890 in Courland, Russia, now Latvia.