Historical

This is a scale model of a synagogue built ca. 1750 in Grodno, Belarus, and destroyed by the Nazis in June 1941

A distinctive and original style of synagogue construction developed in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the mid-sixteenth century.

This olive wood box with painted plaster relief map of Jerusalem inside was made for the American Colony Hotel in Jerusalem

Marketing nationality is not a post-1948 trend, but in fact continues the historical legacies of travel and colonialism in the region.

This photograph depicts some of the 120,000 Iraqi Jews airlifted to Israel in the early 1950s during Operation Ezra & Nehemiah

Men, women, and children newly arrived in Israel, standing in line, facing right. Part of Kitty Groen archive.

This pewter Levitical pitcher was used to wash the hands of the kohen (priest) in preparation for the priestly benediction of the congregation

This is perhaps the only ritual object remaining from a synagogue built in 1887 in Gemünden-am-Main in Unterfranken, Bavaria, Germany, where an organized congregation was established in the 1870s.

This typewriter was used by the Chicago journalist Morris Indritz.

Morris Indritz was born in 1890 in Courland, Russia, now Latvia.

This portfolio of woodcut prints was created by a group of progressive Jewish artists from Chicago in support of Biro-Bidjan, an autonomous Jewish region in Siberia.

In 1934, a Jewish autonomous region was established in Biro-Bidjan (sometimes spelled Birobidzhan), Siberia.

This traveling wardrobe belonged to Yiddish theater star Dina Halpern, and is a relic of a time when plays by Sholem Aleichem, S. Ansky, as well as Yiddish translations of Chekhov, Tolstoy, and Wilder were performed on Chicago’s old West Side.

Dina Halpern was born in Warsaw, Poland in 1909. As a child, she performed as a dancer then joined the Warsaw Yiddish Art Theatre, headed by her great-aunt, Esther Rachel Kaminska.

Child identity card issued to Erich Grunebaum (later Eric Greene) by the German government for the purpose of emigrating to France on a children's transport.

In the years leading up to and through World War II efforts were made to rescue Jewish children from Germany and Nazi-occupied countries.

This prisoner's uniform from Auschwitz is a tragic reminder of the cruelty and inhumanity of the Nazi concentration camps, where prisoners who were not immediately murdered endured the most extreme suffering and humiliation.

Auschwitz-Birkenau was the death site of approximately 1.1 million people.