Historical

This can is from Auschwitz, where poisonous gas was used to murder hundreds of thousands of Jews in the implementation of the Nazis' “Final Solution.”

Following the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, mobile “killing squads” called Einsatzgruppen traveled throughout occupied areas to eliminate local Jewish populations through

A crucial step in the Nazi genocide was the identification and separation of Jews through distinguishing badges and ghettoization.

During World War II,

This propagandistic poster displays key aspects of Nazi antisemitism and racial ideology, which asserted the supremacy of the “Aryan race” and the need to purify Germany of Jews.

Plagued by political unrest and economic depression in the post-World War I era, Germany was fertile ground for the rise of extreme right-wing nationalist organizations.

Abraham Lincoln Marovitz rose from an impoverished immigrant background to become a noted jurist and Illinois’ first Jewish state senator. He was a beloved Chicago icon and a proud Jew.

Abraham Lincoln Marovitz was raised in Chicago’s

Spertus Institute preserves and protects materials from hundreds of local synagogues and organizations. This stained glass window once graced the sanctuary of Shaare Zedek, a Conservative synagogue in Logan Square that had a seating capacity of 1,400.

In Chicago, around 1915, upwardly mobile Eastern European Jews began moving to Logan Square from the congested

This charming, portable dollhouse was made by Holocaust survivors as a gift for a 5-year-old girl.

This dollhouse was made near Hamburg, Germany, as a gift for Caroline Pinder, daughter of Captain Richard and Jessica Pinder, when she was five years old.

This cast plaque pays tribute to Isaac Mayer Wise, the acknowledged architect of American Reform Judaism. It is inscribed with a quote from Genesis 26:12, “Isaac sowed and he reaped one hundred-fold.”

Born in Moravia in 1819, Isaac Mayer Wise immigrated to the United States in 1846 and was appointed rabbi of Congregation Beth El (today Beth Emeth) of Albany, New York.