Holocaust

This pewter Levitical pitcher was used to wash the hands of the kohen (priest) in preparation for the priestly benediction of the congregation

This is perhaps the only ritual object remaining from a synagogue built in 1887 in Gemünden-am-Main in Unterfranken, Bavaria, Germany, where an organized congregation was established in the 1870s.

Child identity card issued to Erich Grunebaum (later Eric Greene) by the German government for the purpose of emigrating to France on a children's transport.

In the years leading up to and through World War II efforts were made to rescue Jewish children from Germany and Nazi-occupied countries.

This spice container was donated by the Jewish Cultural Reconstruction, a body tasked with distributing thousands of heirless Jewish objects looted by the Nazis.

During World War II, the Nazis looted religious and cultural artifacts from individuals, museums, libraries, synagogues, churches and other institutions across Europe.

This prisoner's uniform from Auschwitz is a tragic reminder of the cruelty and inhumanity of the Nazi concentration camps, where prisoners who were not immediately murdered endured the most extreme suffering and humiliation.

Auschwitz-Birkenau was the death site of approximately 1.1 million people.

This can is from Auschwitz, where poisonous gas was used to murder hundreds of thousands of Jews in the implementation of the Nazis' “Final Solution.”

Following the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, mobile “killing squads” called Einsatzgruppen traveled throughout occupied areas to eliminate local Jewish populations through

A crucial step in the Nazi genocide was the identification and separation of Jews through distinguishing badges and ghettoization.

During World War II,

This kimono was acquired in Japan by a Jewish family saved by Chiune Sugihara, the Japanese Consul in Lithuania, who issued transit visas to Jews fleeing Nazi-occupied Poland.

As Nazi persecution of Jews intensified, many sought to flee Germany for refuge in foreign countries.

This propagandistic poster displays key aspects of Nazi antisemitism and racial ideology, which asserted the supremacy of the “Aryan race” and the need to purify Germany of Jews.

Plagued by political unrest and economic depression in the post-World War I era, Germany was fertile ground for the rise of extreme right-wing nationalist organizations.

Maryan S. Maryan spent the majority of his artistic career painting solitary grotesque figures, many with hoods, animal ears, and explosions of innards. These “personnages,” as he called them, reflect the horror and trauma of his wartime experiences.

Maryan S. Maryan was born Pinchas Burstein in Nowy-Sącz, Poland, in 1927.

This charming, portable dollhouse was made by Holocaust survivors as a gift for a 5-year-old girl.

This dollhouse was made near Hamburg, Germany, as a gift for Caroline Pinder, daughter of Captain Richard and Jessica Pinder, when she was five years old.