Synagogue

This is the wimpel of Joseph Wile, one of nine wimpels of the Wile family in the Spertus collection

A wimpel is a Torah binder formed from cloth wrapped around a male infant during the circumcision ceremony. The cloth is cut into four parts and stitched together to create one long banner.

This wooden chest was created to commemorate a revered scholar.

Elijah ben Solomon, also known as the Gaon of Vilna, and by the acronym G”RA, was a Lithuanian Talmudist, Kabbalist, grammarian and mathematician.

This monumental Hanukkah lamp was created for synagogue use, modeled after a biblical menorah of pure gold. It was used at the White House Hanukkah celebration in 2003.

This nine-branched

For centuries, silversmithing in Yemen was a Jewish-dominated craft. Yemeni-Jewish craftsmen created beautiful silver pieces characterized by elaborate granulation and filigree decoration, for Muslim and Jewish clients alike.

The Spertus Institute collection contains many examples of delicate silver jewelry and

Torah crowns like this one, with its distinctive mushroom shape, are unique to Aden, a port city at the mouth of the Red Sea.

Scholars have proposed several possible sources for this distinctive

Spertus Institute preserves and protects materials from hundreds of local synagogues and organizations. This stained glass window once graced the sanctuary of Shaare Zedek, a Conservative synagogue in Logan Square that had a seating capacity of 1,400.

In Chicago, around 1915, upwardly mobile Eastern European Jews began moving to Logan Square from the congested

This Torah case, or tik in Hebrew, originated in Iraq, home to one of the world’s most ancient and historically significant Jewish communities.

A tik, a type of

This light-filled synagogue scene was painted by a Jewish artist who exhibited with the Impressionists.

Artist Jacques Emile Edouard Brandon (1831-1897) was born in Bordeaux, France, to parents of