Amulet (Kamea)

A cabalistic amulet with two seven-branched candlesticks composed of Hebrew sentences.

Unknown Maker

The use of amulets is widespread in Jewish, Christian and Muslim popular belief. Amulets may be made of metal, wood, stone or parchment/paper. They are meant to be protective against illness or death, childlessness, poverty, and unhappiness, and to bring success or good fortune, to ensure safe journeys and so forth. The choice of the wording depends of the protective purpose. The effectiveness of an amulet is a question discussed in the Talmud: “Our teachers set forth: What is an effective amulet? Any which has healed twice or thrice – whether an amulet of script or an amulet of roots, whether for a person mortally ill or for a person not mortally ill” (bT, Schabbat 61a).

  • Amulet (Kamea)

    17th century
    ink on vellum
    Cabalistic amulet with nine square anagram and Hebrew letters below.

  • Amulet (Kamea)

    18th century
    ink on vellum
    Cabalistic amulet consisting of one twenty square and one twenty-five square anagrams, with additional Hebrew writing at base. Amulet for Abraham the son of Malkah, to be protected from illness.

  • Amulet (Kamea)

    Palestine, early 20th century
    ink on parchment
    Fragment. This amulet assures "Asuta" (good health) to the bearer and promises that evil spirits and animals will flee forever. Use of different scripts, magic squares and diminishing triangles signify a waning influence of the evil spirits.

  • Amulet (Kamea)

    20th century?
    ink on parchment
    A large Magen David appears inside a circle; nearby are five smaller repetitions of Magen David in a circle, with various inscriptions. Border on all four sides formed by Hebrew inscription.

  • Amulet (Kamea)

    18th century
    ink on vellum
    Mystical amulet written in Hebrew, with two seven-branched candlesticks composed of ritual Hebrew prayers surrounded by a border of heavier script Hebrew phrases.

Name: Amulet (Kamea)
Artist: Unknown Maker
Location:
Origin: unknown origin, 17th century
Medium: Ink on Parchment
Dimensions: 6 x 3 3/4 in.
Credit: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Pinsof
Catalog Number: 75.3