Metalwork

Pseudo-nickel. Obverse: three hanging balls, in relief (symbol of pawnbroker).  Reverse: caricature of a Jewish pawnbroker, in right profile, in relief.

This pewter Levitical pitcher was used to wash the hands of the kohen (priest) in preparation for the priestly benediction of the congregation

This is perhaps the only ritual object remaining from a synagogue built in 1887 in Gemünden-am-Main in Unterfranken, Bavaria, Germany, where an organized congregation was established in the 1870s.

This spice container was donated by the Jewish Cultural Reconstruction, a body tasked with distributing thousands of heirless Jewish objects looted by the Nazis.

During World War II, the Nazis looted religious and cultural artifacts from individuals, museums, libraries, synagogues, churches and other institutions across Europe.

The design of this mezuzah was inspired by the Apollo Space Shuttle. An identical copy was taken into space by astronaut Gregory Chamitoff.

This

For centuries, silversmithing in Yemen was a Jewish-dominated craft. Yemeni-Jewish craftsmen created beautiful silver pieces characterized by elaborate granulation and filigree decoration, for Muslim and Jewish clients alike.

The Spertus Institute collection contains many examples of delicate silver jewelry and

Torah crowns like this one, with its distinctive mushroom shape, are unique to Aden, a port city at the mouth of the Red Sea.

Scholars have proposed several possible sources for this distinctive

This cast plaque pays tribute to Isaac Mayer Wise, the acknowledged architect of American Reform Judaism. It is inscribed with a quote from Genesis 26:12, “Isaac sowed and he reaped one hundred-fold.”

Born in Moravia in 1819, Isaac Mayer Wise immigrated to the United States in 1846 and was appointed rabbi of Congregation Beth El (today Beth Emeth) of Albany, New York.