Wood

The Omer Calendar serves to count the days from Passover, which commemorates the Exodus, to Shavuot, which commemorates the giving of the Torah.

This charming painted wooden ark was created in the Erzgebirge region of Germany, an area famous for its carved wooden toys.

Noah’s arks were a common toy of the late 19th century and were especially used by Christian children for Sabbath play on Sundays.

This wooden chest was created to commemorate a revered scholar.

Elijah ben Solomon, also known as the Gaon of Vilna, and by the acronym G”RA, was a Lithuanian Talmudist, Kabbalist, grammarian and mathematician.

Spertus Institute preserves and protects materials from hundreds of local synagogues and organizations. This stained glass window once graced the sanctuary of Shaare Zedek, a Conservative synagogue in Logan Square that had a seating capacity of 1,400.

In Chicago, around 1915, upwardly mobile Eastern European Jews began moving to Logan Square from the congested

This charming, portable dollhouse was made by Holocaust survivors as a gift for a 5-year-old girl.

This dollhouse was made near Hamburg, Germany, as a gift for Caroline Pinder, daughter of Captain Richard and Jessica Pinder, when she was five years old.

This Torah case, or tik in Hebrew, originated in Iraq, home to one of the world’s most ancient and historically significant Jewish communities.

A tik, a type of